The conceptualists at Dagobert à l’envers offer a trip into the heart of surrealism as this collection questions the perception of what’s real and conventions of society today.

Interestingly, Dagobert à l’envers is a tribute to the anti-conformism and benevolence of 7th century King Dagobert, our name sake, a sovereign of Burgundy origin and son of Clotaire 1st founder of the unified kingdom of the Franks.
King Dagobert, was a cultivated and elegant king in love with women and nature who stayed regularly in the Ile-de-France region, establishing then in Paris the capital of his kingdom, and to whom history grants numerous charters for the protection of the poor.
 By virtue of his honour the popular song and rhyme “Good King Dagobert” was created in the late 18th century heralding his nobility and in disparity used to chastise and ridicule Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette and the monarchy for their lack thereof. With each town and region suffering at times singular hardships during the reign of Louis XVI, different verses were added along the royal routes befitting the plight of these citizens to further add insult.

The conceptualists at Dagobert à l’envers offer a trip into the heart of surrealism as this collection questions the perception of what’s real and conventions of society today.
Dagobert’s creative teams are sensitive to the questioning of the conventions established by the surrealist French movement in 1924 and especially by its notable contributor, Belgian René Magritte. In part to this key influence, Dagobert à l’envers’ creators proposed reversible designs which together create a new vocabulary in feminine and masculine fashion.

You will see this in the visual themes which echo the language created by Rene Magritte who combined six elements, fire, air, earth, woman (eroticism), house (domesticity) and bells (imagination in trance).
Discover Dagobert à l’envers, a creative expression of mankind’s artistic spirit and quest for liberty!